Cellphones and Cancer

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This article was originally posted on deolaclinic.net site in December last year. Since we are moving to this site, i feel our readers should have the priviledge of being informed about our previous posts and learning a thing or two from them.

Enjoy the article:

The controversy continues. We thought we’ve heard the last of it but believe me, we are just beginning. More findings will come out and we hope that they will be reassuring. But like everything else in life, one can never be too sure. Yes, am talking about the effects of cellphone radiations on the human brain. The latest findings tend to suggest that we may have nothing to fear as far as cancers are concerned.

According to Dr Hans-Christoph Diener MD PHD, published on medscape website under Medscape Neurology, on 14th December 2011 (a week ago), “there is absolutely no risk of developing brain tumor from the use of mobile phones”

Read what Dr Christoph Diener has to say:

“This is a very tricky business. You all remember headlines in newspapers some time ago when retrospective case-controlled studies suggested that people who use mobile phones a lot have an increased risk for brain tumors.

Well, there are some areas of the world where no one would survive if this really were true — let’s be serious. An interesting paper was published in the British Medical Journal [1] in October. A group from Denmark used a huge cohort of cancer patients identified in a national registry. They looked at people who subscribed to a mobile phone service before the year 1995.

They only considered people over the age of 30, because the risk for brain tumors is much lower in the population under 30 years of age. They compared the risk of developing a brain tumor in people who were subscribers to a mobile phone service and people who were nonsubscribers.

The conclusion of this study, which included 360,000 people and identified more than 10,000 brain tumors, was that clearly no relationship existed between the use of mobile phones and brain tumors. This was true for all kinds of tumors: gliomas and meningiomas. It was also true when considering the duration of using a mobile phone. Whether you had a subscription for 10 years or 1 year, it didn’t make a difference.

In addition, there was no relationship between the location of the brain tumor and the use of mobile phones. Most people use their phone on the right side of the head. So if patients ask you, you can clearly say, “Don’t worry, there is absolutely no risk of developing a brain tumor from using a mobile phone.”

While these words are very reassuring and pleasing to us, we on this site would still prefer caution. The use of a headset when making or receiving calls to minimize head contact with the cellphones is still advisable. The cellphone technology is still young and in our opinion, too young for any conclusive yes or no answer to the brain tumor controversy. Remember folks: SAFETY FIRST.

Please feel free to make your comments and contributions on this topic.

2 comments for “Cellphones and Cancer

  1. Afewgoodmen
    March 14, 2012 at 12:27 pm

    Though no compelling evidence shows a direct link between Cancer and cell phone use, I still advise caution. Great Post, DeolaDlinic.

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